New Hollywood Cinema Essay

New generations of filmmakers were able to express their visual ideas on film. Classical Hollywood was declining and rapidly losing money, studios also being sold out to large corporations without any firm knowledge of filmmaking. Studios were merely making films for commercial success, yet for directors of Old Hollywood, such as Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Orson Welles, and Charlie Chaplin (who were able to make their art despite Hollywood’s satisfaction) wanted desperately to engage the younger generation to keep making films and encourage them not endured the high profit commercialism that was dominating Hollywood. Some… Read more

New generations of filmmakers were able to express their visual ideas on film. Classical Hollywood was declining and rapidly losing money, studios also being sold out to large corporations without any firm knowledge of filmmaking. Studios were merely making films for commercial success, yet for directors of Old Hollywood, such as Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, John Ford, Orson Welles, and Charlie Chaplin (who were able to make their art despite Hollywood’s satisfaction) wanted desperately to engage the younger generation to keep making films and encourage them not endured the high profit commercialism that was dominating Hollywood.

Some like Roger Corman and Samuel Fuller even challenged the young filmmakers to new levels of technique and independence (documentary or fiction). Others like Stanley Kubrick, Sidney Lumet, and John Cassavetes who were part of the Old System later adapted and were now a part of the New Wave. Incidentally these filmmakers were the first to break out the conventions of Hollywood’s Old System in gaining independence for their films.

Major European filmmakers who were already established as New Wave directors were later part of New Hollywood as well, such as Milos Foreman and Roman Polanski. Among the new faces of acting included Jack Nicholson, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Dustin Hoffman, Ellen Burstyn, Robert De Niro, Warren Beatty, the list goes on.

Major Influences: French New Wave, Poetic Realism, Italian Neo-Realism, German Expressionism, Swedish Cinema (consisting mostly European film), Classical Hollywood, Indian New Wave, Japanese Cinema

Read less

Essay Classical and Post-Classical Hollywood Cinema

2462 Words10 Pages

Classical and Post-Classical Hollywood Cinema

INTRODUCTION

During the course of this essay it is my intention to discuss the differences between Classical Hollywood and post-Classical Hollywood. Although these terms refer to theoretical movements of which they are not definitive it is my goal to show that they are applicable in a broad way to a cinema tradition that dominated Hollywood production between 1916 and 1960 and which also pervaded Western Mainstream Cinema (Classical Hollywood or Classic Narrative Cinema) and to the movement and changes that came about following this time period (Post-Classical or New Hollywood). I intend to do this by first analysing and defining aspects of Classical Hollywood and having done that,…show more content…

We have a white male heterosexual protagonist. Also a structure of order/disorder/order restored is one of the most fundamental. This structure is will proceed in a linear trajectory towards a high level of closure or resolution. Every question which is raised during the film must be answered. Within our linear trajectory we have a cause and effect pattern which means we will watch an action in one scene and proceed to see its effect or re-action on the following scene. In TOUCH OF EVIL (Orson Welles, USA, 1958) we open with a honeymooning couple. Within moments there is an explosion and disorder is created almost instantly. Our central protagonist, in this case Charlton Heston, combats this disorder for the duration until he eventually finishes back in the arms of his wife. This example represents what David Bordwell (Narration of the fiction film, Madison: University of Wisconsin press, 1985) means when he says “usually the classical syuzhet presents a double causal structure”2. Two plot lines, one which involves a heterosexual romance and another which causes an external struggle (usually for the man and if for the woman inevitably solved by the man).

Classical Gender Representation:

In Classical Hollywood the representation of women is certainly quite clear cut, our main two definable types being that of the virgin and that of the whore. Our virgin represents the patriarchal ideals of family within which at the time a woman should represent

Show More

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *