Guides To Scoring Student Work Checklists And Rubrics For Essays

DISCLAIMER: This data in this section is fictitious and does not, in any way, represent any of the programs at Gallaudet University. This information is intended only as examples.


Types of Scoring Criteria (Rubrics)

A rubric is a scoring guide used to assess performance against a set of criteria. At a minimum, it is a list of the components you are looking for when you evaluate an assignment. At its most advanced, it is a tool that divides an assignment into its component parts, and provides explicit expectations of acceptable and unacceptable levels of performance for each component.

Types of Rubrics

1 - Checklists, the least complex form of scoring system, are simple lists indicating the presence, NOT the quality, of the elements. Therefore, checklists are NOT frequently used in higher education for program-level assessment. But faculty may find them useful for scoring and giving feedback on minor student assignments or practice/drafts of assignments.

Example 1: Critical Thinking Checklist
The student…
__ Accurately interprets evidence, statements, graphics, questions, etc.
__ Identifies the salient arguments (reasons and claims)
__ Offers analyzes and evaluates major alternative points of view
__ Draws warranted, judicious, non-fallacious conclusions
__ Justifies key results and procedures, explains assumptions and reasons
__ Fair-mindedly follows where evidence and reasons lead

Example 2: Presentation Checklist
The student…
__ engaged audience
__ used an academic or consultative ASL register
__ used adequate ASL syntactic and semantic features
__ cited references adequately in ASL
__ stayed within allotted time
__ managed PowerPoint presentation technology smoothly

 

2 - Basic Rating Scales are checklists of criteria that evaluate the quality of elements and include a scoring system. The main drawback with rating scales is that the meaning of the numeric ratings can be vague. Without descriptors for the ratings, the raters must make a judgment based on their perception of the meanings of the terms. For the same presentation, one rater might think a student rated “good” and another rater might feel the same student was "marginal."

Example: Basic Rating Scale for Critical Thinking

 

Excellent
5

Good
4

Fair
3

Marginal
2

Inadequate
1

Accurately interprets evidence, statements, graphics, questions, etc

 

 

 

 

 

Identifies the salient arguments (reasons and claims)

 

 

 

 

 

Offers analyzes and evaluates major alternative points of view

 

 

 

 

 

Draws warranted, judicious, non-fallacious conclusions

 

 

 

 

 

Justifies key results and procedures, explains assumptions and reasons

 

 

 

 

 

Fair-mindedly follows where evidence and reasons lead

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 - Holistic Rating Scales use a short narrative of characteristics to award a single scored based on an overall impression of a student's performance on a task. A drawback to using holistic rating scales is that they do not provide specific areas of strengths and weaknesses and therefore are less useful to help you focus your improvement efforts.

Use a holistic rating scale when the projects to be assessed will vary greatly (e.g., independent study projects submitted in a capstone course) or when the number of assignments to be assessed is significant (e.g., reviewing all the essays from applicants to determine who will need developmental courses).

Example: Holistic Rating Scale for Critical Thinking Scoring

  • Peter A. Facione, Noreen C. Facione, and Measured Reasons LLC. (2009), The Holistic Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric: A Tool for Developing and Evaluating Critical Thinking. Retrieved April 12, 2010 from Insight Assessment.

    4 - Analytic Rating Scales are rubrics that include explicit performance expectations for each possible rating, for each criterion. Analytic rating scales are especially appropriate for complex learning tasks     with multiple criteria.

    Evaluate carefully whether this the most appropriate tool for your assessment needs. They can provide more detailed feedback on student performance; more consistent scoring among raters but the disadvantage is that they can be time-consuming to develop and apply.

    Results can be aggregated to provide detailed information on strengths and weaknesses of a program.

    Example:
    Critical Thinking Portion of the Gallaudet University Rubric for Assessing Written English

Pre-College Skills
1

Emerging Skills
2

Developing Skills
3

Mastering Skills
4

Exemplary Skills
5

IDEAS and CRITICAL THINKING

1. Assignment lacks a central point.

2. Displays central point, although not clearly developed.

3. Displays adequately-developed central point.

4, Displays clear, well-developed central point.

5. Central point is uniquely displayed and developed.

1. Displays no real development of ideas.

2. Develops ideas superficially or inconsistently.

3. Develops ideas with some consistency and depth.

4. Displays insight and thorough development of ideas.

5. Ideas are uniquely developed.

1. Lacks convincing support for ideas.

2. Provides weak support for main ideas.

3. Develops adequate support for main ideas.

4. Develops consistently strong support for main ideas.

5. Support for main ideas is uniquely accomplished.

1. Includes no analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and/or other critical manipulation of ideas.

2. Includes little analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and/or other critical manipulation of ideas.

3. Includes analysis, synthesis, interpretation and/or other critical manipulation of ideas in most parts of the assignment.

4. Includes analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and/or other critical manipulation of ideas, throughout.

5. Includes analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and/or other critical manipulation of ideas, throughout— leading to an overall sense that the piece could withstand critical analysis by experts in the discipline.

1. Demonstrates no real integration of ideas (the author’s or the ideas of others) to make meaning.

2. Begins to integrate ideas (the author’s or the ideas of others) to make meaning.

3. Displays some skill at integrating ideas (the author’s or the ideas of others) to make meaning.

4. Is adept at integrating ideas (the author’s or the ideas of others) to make meaning.

5. Integration of ideas (the author’s or the ideas of others) is accomplished in novel ways.

____________________________________________________

Steps for Creating an Analytic Rating Scale (Rubric) from Scratch

There are different ways to approach building an analytic rating scale: logical or organic. For both the logical and the organic model, steps 1-3 are the same.

Steps 1 – 3: Logical AND Organic Method

Determine the Best Tool

  1. Identify what is being assessed, (e.g., ability to apply theory) as this is focused on program-level learning assessment.

    Determine first whether an analytic rating scale is the most appropriate way of scoring the performance and/or product.
    An analytic rating scale is probably a good choice
    a. if there are multiple aspects of the product or process to be considered
    b. if a basic rating scale or holistic rating scale cannot provide the breadth of assessment you need.

Building the Shell

The Rows

  1. Identify what is being assessed. (e.g., ability to apply theory). 
    • Specify the skills, knowledge, and/or behaviors that you will be looking for.
    • Limit the characteristics to those that are most important to the assessment.
Examples:

 


The Columns

  1. Develop a rating scale with the levels of mastery that is meaningful.

    Tip: Adding numbers to the ratings can make scoring easier. However, if you plan to also use the rating scale for course-level assessment grading as well, a meaning must be attached to that score. For example, what is the minimum score that would be considered acceptable for a “C.”

Example:  

 

Other possible descriptors include:
* Exemplary, Proficient, Marginal, Unacceptable
* Advanced, High, Intermediate, Novice
* Beginning, Developing, Accomplished, Exemplary
* Outstanding, Good, Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory

 

Step 4:

Writing the Performance Descriptors in the Cells

The descriptors are the critical piece of an analytic rating scale. To produce useful, valid scores, attributes in your descriptors must be consistent across the ratings and easy to read. See examples of inconsistent performance characteristics and suggested corrections.

  1. Use either the logical or the organic method to write the descriptions for each criterion at each level of mastery.

Logical Method

Organic Method

For each criterion, at each rating level, brainstorm a list of the performance characteristics*. Each should be mutually exclusive.Have experts sort sample assignments into piles labeled by ratings (e.g., Outstanding, Good, Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory)
  Based on the documents in the piles, determine the performance characteristics* that distinguish the assignments

Tips: Keep list of characteristics manageable by only including critical evaluative components. Extremely long, overly-detailed lists make a rating scale hard to use.

In addition to having descriptions brief, the language should be consistent. Below are several ideas to keep descriptors consistent:

  • Refer to specific aspects of the performance for each level

    3

    2

    1

    analyses the effect of …

    describes the effects of …

    lists the effects of …

  • Keep the aspects of a performance stay the same across the levels but adding adjectives or adverbial phrases to show the qualitative difference

    3

    2

    1

    provides a complex explanation

    provides a detailed explanation

    provides a limited explanation

    shows a comprehensive knowledge

    shows a sound knowledge

    shows a basic knowledge

  • Refer to the degree of assistance needed by the student to complete the task

    3

    2

    1

    uses correctly and independently

    uses with occasional peer or teacher assistance

    uses only with teacher guidance

  • Use numeric references to show quantitative differences among levels
    A word of warning: numeric references on their own can be misleading. They are best teamed with a qualitative reference (eg three appropriate and relevant examples) to avoid ignoring quality at the expense of quantity.

    3

    2

    1

    provides three appropriate  examples

    provides twoappropriate  examples

    provides an appropriate  example

    uses several relevant strategies

    uses some relevant strategies

    uses few or no relevant strategies

Steps 5-6: Logical AND Organic Methods

  1. Test the rating scale before making it official. Have a norming* session.
    Ask colleagues who were not involved in the rating scale’s development to apply it to some products or behaviors and revise as needed to eliminate ambiguities, confusion, and/or inconsistencies. You might also let students self-assess using the rating scale.

    *See University of Hawaii’s “Part 6. Scoring Rubric Group Orientation and Calibration” for directions for this process.
  2. Review and revise.

Steps for Adapting an Existing Analytic Rating Scale (Rubric)

 

  1. Evaluate the rating scale. Ask yourself:
  • Does the rating scale relate to all or most the outcome(s) I need to assess?
  • Does it address anything extraneous?
  1. Adjust the rating scale to suit your specific needs.
  • Add missing criteria
  • Delete extraneous criteria
  • Adapt the rating scale
  • Edit the performance descriptors
  1. Test the rating scale.
  2. Review and revise again, if necessary.

Uses of Rating Scales (Rubrics)

Use rating scales for program-level assessment to see trends in strengths and weaknesses of groups of students.

Examples

  • To evaluate a holistic project (e.g., theses, exhibitions, research project) in capstone course that pulls together all that students have learned in the program.
  • Supervisors might use a rating scale developed by the program to evaluate the field experience of students and provide the feedback to both the student and the program.
  • Aggregate the scores of rating scale used to evaluate a course-level assignment. For example, the Biology department decides to develop a rating scale to evaluate students' reports from 300- and 400-level sections. The professors use the scores to help determine the students’ grades and provide students with feedback for improvement. The scores are also given to the department’s Assessment Coordinator to summarize to determine how well they are meeting their student learning outcome, "Make appropriate inferences and deductions from biological information."

For more information on using course-level assessment to provide feedback to students and to determine grades, see University of Hawaii’s “Part 7. Suggestions for Using Rubrics in Courses” and the section onConverting Rubric Scores to Gradesin Craig A. Mertler’s  “Designing Scoring Rubrics for Your Classroom”.

Sample Rating Scales (Rubrics)

Resources

Adapted from sources below:

Allen, Mary. (January, 2006). Assessment Workshop Material. California State University, Bakersfield. Retrieved DATE fromhttp://www.csub.edu/TLC/options/resources/handouts/AllenWorkshopHandoutJan06.pdf 

Creating and Using Rubrics. (March, 2008). University of Hawai’i at Manoa. Retrieved April 5, 2010  fromhttp://www.uhm.hawaii.edu/assessment/howto/rubrics.htm

Creating an Original Rubric. Teaching Methods and Management, TeacherVision. Retrieved April 7, 2010 fromhttp://www.teachervision.fen.com/teaching-methods-and-management/rubrics/4523.html?detoured=1

Danielson, Cherry and Naser, Curtis. (November 7, 2009). Developing Effective Rubrics: A New Tool in Your Assessment Toolbox. Workshop at Annual NEAIR Conference.

How to Design Rubrics. Assessment for Learning Curriculum Corporation. Retrieved April 7, 2010 fromhttp://www.assessmentforlearning.edu.au/professional_learning/success_criteria_and_rubrics/success_design_rubrics.html

Mertler, Craig A. (2001). Designing Scoring Rubrics for Your Classroom. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation. Retrieved April 7, 2010 fromhttp://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=7&n=25

Mueller, Jon. (2001). Rubrics. Authentic Assessment Toolbox. Retrieved April 12, 2010 fromhttp://jonathan.mueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/rubrics.htm  

Rubric (academic). (2010, March 3). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved April 70, 2010, fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubric_(academic)  

Tierney, Robin & Marielle Simon. (2004). What's Still Wrong With Rubrics: Focusing on the Consistency of Performance Criteria Across Scale Levels. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 9(2). Retrieved April 13, 2010 fromhttp://PAREonline.net/getvn.asp?v=9&n=2  

 

What is a scoring rubric?

How do you know if your students have learned something you’ve taught in the classroom? Evaluating the learning process is no simple task. Since learning is a dynamic and complex process, teachers need a diverse set of tools for measuring the progress of his/her students. One of those tools is the scoring rubric.

A scoring rubric is a standard of performance for a defined population. It is a pre-determined set of goals and objectives on which to base an evaluation. In the Higher Education Report, S.M. Brookhart describes a scoring rubric as, “Descriptive scoring schemes that are developed by teachers or other evaluators to guide the analysis of the products or processes of students’ efforts.”

This article will explore in depth the different types of scoring rubrics, how to make one yourself, as well as an analysis into how scoring rubrics enhance learning.

Types of Scoring Rubrics

Despite the overwhelming number of scoring rubrics you can find on the Internet and in various textbooks and curriculum guides, most rubrics fall into one of two categories: Analytic or holistic scoring rubrics.

Analytic scoring rubrics

Analytic rubrics attempt to break down the final product or goal into measurable components and parts. In other words, your student has a project or assignment and you use an analytic scoring rubric to evaluate all the pieces of the project. Analytic rubrics typically use numbers to measure quality. Let’s take the example below.

Student Assignment: Write a one-page paper on your summer vacation.

The rubric might break down the evaluation process into three parts- content of the paper, grammar and mechanics, and organization of ideas. For each of these components, numbers would be assigned.

(1) Needs improvement, (2) Developing, (3) Goal, (4) Above average, (5) Excellent

The rubric also explains what exactly each of those numbers mean. So a student might have a score like this:

Content (3) – Ideas were developed and thought out. Examples were given.
Grammar (4) – The paper was free of all spelling and grammar errors. There were only a few awkward sentences.
Organization (2) – Each idea was not separated out into paragraphs. Author jumped around and confused the reader.

With an analytic scoring rubric, the student and teacher can see more clearly what areas need work and what areas are mastered. It is far more descriptive than a simple A, B, or C grade.

Holistic scoring rubrics

Whereas analytic rubrics break down the assignment into measurable pieces, a holistic scoring rubric evaluates the work as a whole. In the above example, a holistic rubric would look like this:

Student Assignment: Write a one-page paper on your summer vacation.

(1) Needs improvement: The story is not clearly organized, grammar errors make it difficult to understand, and content is lacking.

(2) Developing: The student has a grasp on the assignment but needs to spend more time organizing thoughts, adding details, and fixing errors.

(3) Goal: The student has completely the paper using good content, correct, grammar, and a logical organization of ideas.

(4) Above average: The story is full of great content, organized well, and free from spelling and grammar errors.

(5) Excellent: The student went above and beyond, adding rich detail to his/her story. The content is interesting and organized well. Thoughts are well described. Grammar and mechanics are flawless.

With this rubric, the piece is evaluated as a whole.

General or task-specific?

Rubrics can be either. General rubrics are used across multiple assignments. Once you have developed a general rubric, you can use it to measure different subjects and lessons. Task-specific rubrics are designed to evaluate one specific assignment. Using these guidelines, you can categorize your rubrics into one of the following categories:

General holistic scoring rubric

General analytic scoring rubric

Task-specific analytic scoring rubric

Task-specific holistic scoring rubric

General holistic rubrics have advantages and disadvantages. If you spend the time to create a solid scoring rubric, you won’t have to do it again. Students will quickly grasp the “meaning” of each number- therefore understanding what needs improving from assignment to assignment. The value of each number is clear. The disadvantage to this type of rubric is that different subjects may need more specific scoring instructions. With the same rubric used over and over again, your or your students might get stuck in a rut – always using the same score.

General analytic scoring rubrics are difficult to create. Since an analytic rubric is designed to break an assignment into pieces, the best bet is to create a general analytic rubric for a particular subject (like one for writing, one for math, one for reading, etc.). Each subject has similar “measurables” – something that would be difficult to create across different disciplines.

Task-specific analytic scoring rubrics are the most comprehensive and detailed. While they provide a great source of feedback to the student and teacher, it does require more work upfront to create. Creating a task-specific analytic rubric for each assignment would be tremendously tedious. Save these types of rubrics for projects that are large and need to be broken down into parts and pieces for your students to manage and understand.

Task-specific holistic rubrics are like the “balanced” middle of the road rubric. They are designed for a particular assignment, but evaluate it as a whole rather than in parts.

References:

https://condor.depaul.edu/tla/Assessment/TypesRubrics.html

https://www.utexas.edu/academic/ctl/assessment/iar/students/report/rubrics-types.php

Creating a Scoring Rubric

Why is it important to create scoring rubrics for your students? Well for one, it helps to spell out clearly what you expect from them in terms of quality, content, and effort. It gives you an objective criterion on which to base a grade, eliminating a lot of the “It’s not fair!” mentality that can creep in when grades seem arbitrary. It allows your students the opportunity to understand more comprehensively your expectations of performance. A scoring rubric can also be used for peer-to-peer evaluation. This is another way to engage your students in the learning process.

  1. Decide what kind of rubric you are going to make- general or task specific, and then analytic or holistic.
  2. Use a Word processing software or Excel to make a chart.
  3. If you are creating an analytic scoring rubric, divide the project or assignment up into parts (for example, a math project might have the categories – creativity, understanding of mathematical concepts, correct answers, presentation, effort, etc.).
  4. Place these categories in one column down the left side of the table or chart.
  5. Create a scoring method. You can use numbers (i.e. 1-5) and attach words to each number (like 1 is poor, 2 is below average, 3 is average, 4 is above average, and 5 is excellent). If it is a task-specific analytic rubric, you can be even more descriptive.
  6. Put these scores along the top of the chart in one row. Each score should represent a column.
  7. Now you have to write up a short blurb for each category and score. Here is an example of a task-specific analytic scoring rubric for a math project.

Student’s work shows little preparation, creativity or effort. Lots of errors and sloppy handwriting.

Student put for minimal effort. Has a few errors and could have added more to the presentation.

Student gave effort to the project. Met all the expectations. Didn’t go above and beyond.

Student spent a lot of time working to make sure the presentation was well done. Got help and asked for feedback.

Student went above and beyond the assignment. Did extra research and work.

Understanding of concepts

Didn’t incorporate concepts into project. Misunderstood the ideas and principles.

Understood a few of the concepts, but still left out pieces and parts of the assignment.

Student understood concepts and completed all the tasks in the assignment.

Student understood the concepts and did more than what was expected of him/her.

Student mastered the concepts and even added more to the principles.

Correct answers to problems

Most or all of the answers to each problem were incorrect.

Half of the problems were incorrect.

Student got most of the problems correct with only a few errors.

Student got every problem correct.

Student got every problem correct, including the bonus work.

Presentation was rushed, sloppy, and too short. Lacked effort and/or visual tools.

Presentation was short and lacking creativity. Some visuals were used.

Presentation was correct length. Student used visuals.

Presentation was well done, with visuals, interaction with the class, and comprehensive.

Presentation was creative, excellently done, using visuals and props.

The student should be given the scoring rubric before the project begins. This way, he/she understands exactly what you are grading on and how you will assess performance. Once you’ve graded the presentation with the rubric, you can add up the scores and take the average. When using a 1-5 model, it’s easy to assign 1=F, 2=D, 3=C, 4=B, 5=A.

You can also leave an extra column to write in comments about each category. Whenever possible, write criterion that are measurable. Use specifics. For general rubrics, this is a bit more challenging, but you can get some idea by perusing online rubrics to see what kind of language other educators use.

Using Descriptive Gradations

The example above gives you some generic terms to use (like poor, average, etc.), but depending on the task, other words might work better to describe your expectations and criteria. Here are some options to try:

  1. Beginning, developing, accomplished, exemplary
  2. No, maybe, yes
  3. Missing, unclear, clear, thorough
  4. Below expectations, basic, proficient, outstanding
  5. Never, rarely, sometimes, often, always
  6. Novice, apprentice, proficient, master
  7. Lead, bronze, silver, gold
  8. Byte, kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte
  9. Adagio, andante, moderato, allegro

Using Your Students To Create Rubrics

It is crucial that you use language your students can understand. For younger children, you might even use images (of a smiley to sad face for example) to help them understand the expectations. When creating a task-specific analytic rubric, start by drawing the rubric on a whiteboard or poster and have them come up with the language to express what is required.

This writing rubric below is a simplified example that a teacher might use for an elementary assignment.

I had a beginning to my story.

I don’t know if I had a beginning.

My story started without a beginning.

I mentioned my character’s name and described him/her.

I mentioned my character’s name but didn’t describe him/her

I forgot to introduce my character.

I wrote about the character’s problem.

I don’t know if the character has a story problem.

The character doesn’t have a story problem.

I wrote about what happened to the character after the problem.

I wrote an ending but didn’t tell people what happened to the character.

I didn’t write an ending.

Weighted Rubrics

Sometimes you want one part of the rubric to count more than others. A simple way to do this is to assign percentages to each category. In the example below (the math scoring rubric), the understanding of concepts and the correct answers categories are going to weigh more heavily. For purposes of our example, let’s assign criterion two and three 40% of the project.

Student’s work shows little preparation, creativity or effort. Lots of errors and sloppy handwriting.

Student put for minimal effort. Has a few errors and could have added more to the presentation.

Student gave effort to the project. Met all the expectations. Didn’t go above and beyond.

Student spent a lot of time working to make sure the presentation was well done. Got help and asked for feedback.

Student went above and beyond the assignment. Did extra research and work.

2. Understanding of concepts 40%

Didn’t incorporate concepts into project. Misunderstood the ideas and principles.

Understood a few of the concepts, but still left out pieces and parts of the assignment.

Student understood concepts and completed all the tasks in the assignment.

Student understood the concepts and did more than what was expected of him/her.

Student mastered the concepts and even added more to the principles.

3. Correct answers to problems 40%

Most or all of the answers to each problem were incorrect.

Half of the problems were incorrect.

Student got most of the problems correct with only a few errors.

Student got every problem correct.

Student got every problem correct, including the bonus work.

Presentation was rushed, sloppy, and too short. Lacked effort and/or visual tools.

Presentation was short and lacking creativity. Some visuals were used.

Presentation was correct length. Student used visuals.

Presentation was well done, with visuals, interaction with the class, and comprehensive.

Presentation was creative, excellently done, using visuals and props.

So in this case, the student got a 2 in criteria 1, a 4 in criteria 2, a 3 in criteria 3, and a 2 in criteria 4. If you did not weight the grade, the average score would equal 2.2 or a D. However with a weighted rubric, the most important parts of the grade should account for more. Out of a possible 100%, each number should be counted according to the percentage given. Your formula would look like this:

2 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 2 = 32 10 = 3.2 or a C.

(Criterion 2 and 3 are each counted four times, and 1 and 4 are counted once – equally ten points or 1.0)

Looking at this rubric, it would seem that a C is a better (or more accurate) grade for this student. They completed the problems and understood the concepts, but didn’t spend a lot of time and energy in the presentation part of it.

Sites For Scoring Rubric Resources

If you are short on time or simply need a little help getting started, the following list will help you find excellent already-made scoring rubrics. There are also sites that can help you create them as well!

Rubric generators

  1. iRubric – Free rubric building tools plus options for analyzing data and sharing rubrics with other teachers around the world.
  2. Teach-nology– A comprehensive list of rubric building tools arranged by subject.
  3. Digi-tales – Create a scoring rubric for evaluating media projects.
  4. The Canadian Teacher – A rubric builder that allows you to build weighted rubrics, checklists, and rating scales.
  5. Rubistar– Register for an account and have access to a variety of rubric tools, plus the ability to edit, save, and access online.
  6. Scholastic – A simple and fast rubric tool. Fill in the fields and it will arrange it in a matrix for you.

Premade scoring rubrics

  1. Exemplars – Standard rubrics for math, science, reading, and writing. They offer some student evaluation rubrics as well.
  2. Teacher Rubrics for Secondary and College – This website is a list of rubrics that one faculty member has made available for other teachers.
  3. University of Wisconsin – Rubrics for wikis, web projects, PowerPoint, oral presentations, as well as general subject areas like math and writing.
  4. Teacher planet – Rubrics are organized by subject and level. They also offer a rubric generator too.
  5. Kathy Schrock – One of the largest lists of common core rubrics.

Subscription scoring rubric websites

  1. Rubrix – Designed for school systems and HR professionals. Full set of tools, mobile functions, and more.
  2. rGrade – Comprehensive assessment management system.

How Do Scoring Rubrics Enhance Learning?

First and foremost, a scoring rubric makes it easy for your students to understand your expectations as the teacher. When an assignment is given without a rubric, there are a lot of assumptions that can be made about the quality, quantity, and project outcome that can result in rabbit trails and a poor grade. Rubrics spell everything out in an easy digestible format.

  1. Rubrics help educators’ grade projects fairly.
  2. Rubrics speed up the grading process with clearly outlined goals.
  3. Rubrics allow the student to use the scoring sheet to grade someone else’s work.
  4. Rubrics are an easy way for parents to understand the final grade on the assignment.
  5. Rubrics help to define the goal and reason for the assignment or project.
  6. Rubrics keep students on track during the course of the assignment.
  7. Rubrics give more specific feedback so that the student can see where his/her strengths and weaknesses lie.
  8. Rubrics are a tool to help the student dig deeper into an assignment.
  9. Rubrics are easy to understand and can help give instructions about the project.
  10. Rubrics outline various skill sets that students should be aware of during the assignment.
  11. Rubrics allow students to check their work throughout the project for instant monitoring and feedback.
  12. Rubrics give teachers data for future planning and curriculum design.
  13. Rubrics ensure that different teachers will all grade a project using the same criterion and goals.

So Are There Any Disadvantages To Scoring Rubrics?

Even though rubrics are a great classroom tool, there are a few pitfalls to avoid. For one, scoring rubrics can take a long time to create – especially if they are task-specific and you spend time thinking through each criterion carefully. A teacher’s work needs to be balanced between instruction, mentorship, and feedback. Try not to get caught up in creating a custom rubric for every single assignment. Don’t be afraid to use rubrics that are already made up for you.

  1. Watch out for rubrics that are poorly designed. If the criteria are not thought out well, then your students will be heading in the wrong direction.
  2. Too many rubrics can cause creativity to dwindle. If your students are always performing to the written standard, they may be less likely to think outside the box.
  3. Rubrics may cause your most intelligent students to underperform. Once in a while, let their imaginations determine how high or far they can go in an assignment. It may be further than you dreamed.
  4. Poor descriptions will render a scoring rubric useless. Make your assessments as specific as possible.
  5. Rubrics can overwhelm students if the criterion is lengthy. Maybe breaking the project into parts with “mini” rubrics would be more helpful.
  6. Some educators say that turning rubric scores into grades is unhelpful. Scoring rubrics should be the extent of the evaluation, not trying to turn it into an A, B, or C.

Ultimately, balance is key. Scoring rubrics are a great asset to both teachers and students, as long as the classroom isn’t wholly designed to simply meet a goal. We all know that learning is far more dynamic and creativity than what can fit inside a little box.

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